The Times Literary
Supplement
17th September 2019

 

‘Kasket's novel insight is to suggest this may mark a "sea change in how we experience death, and in the place and influence of our ancestors in society,"'‘ writes Samuel Earle in his review. ‘The digital dead are not cordoned off into cemeteries, out of sight and out of mind. They inhabit the same space as the living.’

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Der Spiegel
24th August 2019

Germany’s premier weekly news magazine interviews Elaine for a piece on what happens to our data when we die. Article by Julia Koch.

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Security Advisor Middle East
21st July 2019

‘Social media accounts are…just a fraction of a person’s digital legacy; even individuals who think they have little digital footprint have much to consider,’ writes Daniel Bardsley in this UAE publication, featuring Elaine and James Norris of the Digital Legacy Association. ‘“One of the things that really is beneath people’s radar is the stuff that our devices automatically capture for us,” says Kasket.’

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Visão
21st July 2019

Clara Soares writes about All the Ghosts in the Portuguese weekly news magazine.

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The New Scientist
22nd June 2019

‘From exposing sexual secrets to repairing a bad image, the digital afterlife and who controls it matters in unexpected ways, as a fascinating new book explains,’ writes Simon Ing.

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O Globo / Epoca
6th June 2019

All the Ghosts featured in an Portuguese-language article by Andre Duchiade, in the features magazine one of Brazil’s largest broadsheets.

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The Guardian
2nd June 2019

‘What we want to do and what the law allows us to do with our digital legacy can therefore be very different things,’ writes Amelia Tait. ‘Yet at present it is not the law that dominates our decisions about digital death. “Regulation is always really slow to keep up with technology,” says Kasket. “That means that platforms and corporations like Facebook end up writing the rules.”’

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The Times Literary
Supplement
30th May 2019

‘Posthumous posts’, Elaine’s essay in the leading international weekly for literary culture, examines the ethics of memorialisation and mourning on social media. ‘We might laud Facebook’s willingness to grapple with the problem of deceased people’s data on their site, particularly since so few companies are dealing with it at all,’ Elaine writes. ‘Yet, no matter what systems and rules Facebook and any other big tech company develop, the idiosyncrasy of grief will flummox them every time. For every birthday reminder suspended when an artificially intelligent coroner declares a Facebook user DOSM (dead on social media), one mourner will breathe a sigh of relief and another will experience a paroxysm of secondary loss.’

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The Psychologist
17th May 2019

‘The writing is top-notch, and although written for non-specialists, it is never dumbed down and firmly speaks the language of psychology,’ writes Simon Bignell in his review. ‘For book lovers of psychology or popular science, this style of writing will be a familiar mix of personal anecdote and empiricism, with academic citations only when needed. This sense of balance in writing is rare and hard to achieve but was flawless.’

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The New Scotsman
16th May 2019

‘Elaine highlights that while privacy is a fundamental human right, it is not a right for the dead. There is no legislation that protects people’s privacy when they’re gone,’ writes Susan Brown of Marie Curie Scotland. ‘A digital will can ensure that only certain people can access someone’s data, but that might have serious implications, especially if a loved one finds information in an online account that the person never intended to share and is no longer there to explain. That’s part of a digital legacy too, and can cause real pain to those left behind. What can that do to the grieving process of the bereaved?’

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BEME News
16th May 2019

Elaine and All the Ghosts in the Machine featured on Lou Foglia’s investigation of how Facebook and Google will handle our deaths

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The Guardian
30th April 2019

Elaine and researchers from the Oxford Internet Institute feature in a story on how Facebook could have 4.9 billion dead people on the site by 2099. Matthew Cantor writes: ‘In an interview with the Observer this weekend, the psychologist Elaine Kasket said that when family members seek access to a deceased relative’s data, Facebook offers “something along the lines of: ‘We’d love to be able to help you with this but we’re not able to.’ They say they are protecting the (technically nonexistent) right of privacy of the deceased.”’

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The Observer
27th April 2019

‘Like people, social networking sites, such as MySpace or Friendster, also die,’ points out Ian Tucker. Elaine responds to that in her Q&A with The Observer: ‘The Marie Kondo idea that you should be storing all your books, photographs and music in the cloud, so we have nice clean shelves, is great. But just be aware that your grandchildren might know nothing about you – unless someone is taking the time to think: that platform is becoming obsolete, let’s make sure we download an archive.’

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The National (UAE)
23rd April 2019

‘Kasket believes that it’s impossible for social media companies to determine where the pain points are and somehow fix them, regardless of how much research they do,’ writes Rhodri Marsden in his article ‘How social media companies deal with online profiles of the dead.’ ‘“Everybody has different sorts of grief,” she says. “And as you can’t decide what’s going to hurt and what’s not going to hurt, the companies in control of the data will continue to make impositions.”’

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The Telegraph
21st April 2019

What will happen to your emails when you die?’ asks Jake Kerridge in his four-star review of All the Ghosts. ‘Dr Kasket, who writes with a pleasingly self-deprecating wit and a determination to give every side of an argument a fair hearing, is as comfortable exploring the philosophical implications of digital legacies as she is on the legal and scientific nitty-gritty. She presents us with a fascinating glimpse of a future in which our legacy may involve the creation of online avatars – or even android versions – of ourselves that will be able to convey our personalities to descendants as yet unborn.’

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Vice
28th March 2019

‘Every single day, we leave some kind of personal imprint on the internet,’ writes Emily Reynolds in ‘Why you should make a “digital will'“‘. ‘What exactly that imprint is—we like to believe – is up to us. But this isn't quite true. As last week's Myspace mass-deletion proved, we're not quite in control of what we leave behind, even if we're told that everything we post online is forever. This is hard enough to swallow when we're alive. But what about when we're dead? Psychologist Elaine Kasket has spent the last decade investigating this dilemma, and in a new book—All the Ghosts in the Machine—she goes further, questioning whether we can even start asking these questions in a meaningful way while big tech has its claws dug into every facet of our lives.’

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Psychology Today
8th March 2016

‘While some message senders may actually expect the dead to receive their words in an afterlife, not all hold that belief,’ writes Matt Huston in his article ‘All that remains’. ‘For them, social media may act as a kind of "secular heaven," Kasket says, fostering the reassuring illusion that their loved ones linger somewhere—in this case, within the expanse of the Internet, where traces of them remain even after their corporeal self is gone.’

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